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Pride of Baltimore II

Alpena - Chicago, 2008


The Pride of Baltimore II is a reproduction of an early 19th century "Baltimore Clipper", a topsail schooner with heavily raked masts. It is, however, modified with modern safety features.

In July, 2008 I sailed with my son Rick on the Pride of Baltimore II from Alpena, Michigan to Chicago, Illinois. The photographs below were taken on that voyage.

For more information on Pride of Baltimore II:
The Pride of Baltimore II at Alpena
Pride of Baltimore II at Alpena


The main salon
Main salon



Loading a 4 pdr cannon for a salute on returning from day sail Sunday July 6
Loading 4 pdr cannon


Firing the salute
Firing the cannon

On July 8th the soggy skies dripped down all day from murk sunset to foul sunrise. This is Mackinac Island seen through the haze with the Grand Hotel at the center of frame.
Mackinac Island


On the port tack at sunset. Obviously heeling a bit. The drum in the foreground is, no doubt, a leftover WWII depth charge kept for use against Japanese submarines.
On the port tack


Second mate (the ship's navigator) on the right and other members of First Watch.
Members of First and Forenoon watch


Rick at the helm
Rick at the helm


The compass. The thing abaft the compass is the lazarette hatch.
Compass


Churning along.
Port tack


Bowsprit with fore staysail (foreground) and jib set on port tack.
Bowsprit


Chuck at the helm
Chuck at the helm


It would be easy to hang yourself on this ship.
Ropes

More rope


And now for the best part -- an exclusive tour of

The Bilges of the Pride of Baltimore


The forepeak bilge. This was my favorite. Really a very nice bilge.
Frepeak bilge



The Foc'sl Bilge.
Frecastle Bilge

The main salon bilge. This too is a very fine bilge indeed.
Mail salon bilge


The engine room bilge.
Engine room Bilge

The aft cabin bilge.
Aft cabin bilge

And finally, the lazarette bilge, which is pretty hard to see in this photo. It sort of hides its light under a bushel.
Lazarette bilge.


Preparing to take in the jib
Taking in the jib


When under way, the cannon are secured to avoid the dreaded "loose cannon".
Secured cannon


Looking up the foremast
Foremast


Waves. I would say these are at least thirty or forty feet.
Waves